Having the best Negotiations

Fully Prepare for the meeting 

Outline the points you want to discuss, point by point. Doing this will make you a stronger and more confident negotiator.

 

Consider your timing 

Choose a negotiation time when everyone is calm and there’s plenty of time to discuss the issues. If emotions run high or there’s not enough time to satisfactorily talk through each point, negotiations are less likely to be successful or friendly.

 

Know your real needs

Understand what it is that you really want and need to get out of the negotiations. It’s impossible to effectively negotiate when you are unclear about what it is you are trying to get.

 

Understand their needs 

You also want to know the other person’s position and what they need to get out of the negotiation. Having a clear understanding of this can help you in many ways, including coming off as thoughtful and sympathetic to their side.

 

Seel out a good negotiation coach.

When you’re facing an important negotiation, chances are, there’s someone in your organization who you can turn to for top-notch advice. Rather than simply telling you what to do in a particular situation, effective negotiation coaches focus on improving your negotiation ski

Listen more than you speak.

The goal of a negotiation isn’t just to get what you want,  but also to help the other side get what they want. (Otherwise, how will you ever strike a deal?) To do that, you need to actually know what the other side wants — which means you have to listen.

 

Offer benefits

Come up with a few solid benefits for them when they accept your proposal. Having these in mind will demonstrate that you’ve done your homework and that you both have common goals, even if some of the ways you want to go about meeting those goals are different.

A big part of any negotiation is the ability to make a persuasive case for yourself.

This animated video takes a look at the 6 universal principles of persuasion that Dr Robert Cialdini first published in his groundbreaking book: Influence.

 

Decide on your BATNA’s

Your Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement or BATNA puts you in a powerful spot both figuratively and literally. When you go into a negotiation knowing what you will and won’t accept, and what alternatives you have if an agreement can’t be reached, you won’t feel like you have to accept whatever they offer because it’s your only option.

 

Only Focus on essential points

Once you know what you want out of the negotiation, you need to prioritize your desires so you can focus on one or two main points of negotiation. Going in with a long list of demands can lead to frustration and a breakdown in the negotiation process.

 

Find the right way to frame the negotiation.

Maybe the frame is money. Or time. Or the delivery schedule. Or …

Frame a negotiation correctly and you can make it easier to negotiate the points that matter to you.

 

Use active listening

This type of listening does a couple of different things for the process. It ensures you understand the other person’s ideas and motivations, as well as demonstrating that you are paying attention to what they are saying.

 

Get it in writing

Even if the negotiation is with a friend or family member, put everything in writing. Create a contract and get it notarized if necessary. This will save a lot of trouble later if the person reneges on the agreement.

It may sound harsh, but it’s necessary so that you do not get taken advantage of.

Always get when you give.

Whenever you make a concession, make sure you receive something in return. Maybe you will provide a discount,  but your delivery schedule will be extended. Or you’ll need a larger deposit.

Keep in mind you can also use the same approach as a buyer.

 

There are only two books about negotiation, that I recommend – and this is always the first one: 

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

The other book, I suggest everyone reads:

Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade

 

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